Month: April 2020

Subversion Source Control for game development

Subversion Source Control for game development

This is part of a series of posts on source control for game development. Read more in the Blog.

We couldn’t reach the end of this series without talking about a source control giant, I’m talking of course about Subversion or SVN for short.

Every programmer should have heard of Subversion. Its massive popularity from the 2000s until today has only been outshined by Git fairly recently. In the games industry, SVN remains a very popular choice due to being free and implementing the file-based source control model which maps so well to our needs, as outlined in the previous articles. While not a common choice in larger studios, smaller ones and indie teams have long been using SVN as their backbone and for good reason.

Personally, I haven’t used SVN since my early programming days, and never in my professional career. This article was a good opportunity to get familiar with it again and see how it competes against the other solutions we have studied so far.

So, is SVN a good source control solution for game development? Let’s dig in!

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Posted by Samuel Kahn in Source Control, Source Control Comparison
GitHub is free for Teams

GitHub is free for Teams

GitHub has just made their Teams plan available for free. This allows for unlimited collaborators and unlimited private repositories. They have also reduced their paid plans from $9/user/month to an extremely competitive $4/user/month. Here is the full pricing breakdown.

This has the potential to be a real game-changer, and I will take the opportunity to update my comparison of Git hosting providers shortly.

In the meantime, let’s examine how GitHub compares with other hosting providers now that users are essentially free. Its main downside was the built-in limitation of 1GB for LFS, which can be extended by increments of 50GB for $5/month. This also includes bandwidth usage on top of storage, which means the more users, the quicker bandwidth will be used up.

I took the time to update the graph comparisons for typical use cases and the result is impressive:

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Posted by Samuel Kahn in Source Control